• Users Online: 736
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 198-202

Safety of skeletal traction through the distal femur, proximal tibia, and calcaneus


Department of Orthopaedics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Geoffrey S Marecek
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, 1520 San Pablo Street, Suite 2000, Los Angeles, CA 90033
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/atr.atr_53_19

Get Permissions

Introduction: Skeletal traction provides pain relief and temporary stability in patients anticipating surgery for a variety of lower-extremity fractures. Recent literature suggests that distal femoral traction provides pain relief and is safe; however, data regarding proximal tibial and calcaneal pins are primarily historical and limited. The purpose of this study is to document complications associated with distal femur, proximal tibia, and calcaneal traction pin placement. Materials and Methods: We identified patients with the distal femur, proximal tibia, and calcaneal traction pin placement from January 2013 to June 2016. Chart review was utilized to identify any complications, including nerve or vascular injuries, need for revision, or infection. Results: Five hundred and nineteen traction pins were eligible for review, consisting of 120 calcaneal traction pins, 129 distal femoral pins, and 270 proximal tibia traction pins. Primary diagnosis was defined as 305 femur fractures (58.8%), 60 tibial shaft fractures (11.6%), 60 acetabular fractures (11.6%), 38 pilon fractures (7.3%), 30 pelvic ring injuries (5.8%), 21 tibial plateau fractures (4.0%), and 5 hip dislocations (1.0%). We identified 17 (3.3%) adverse events potentially attributable to traction pin insertion. Pins that became infected were found to have been in place for a significantly longer duration (18.3 days compared to 5.8 days, P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Traction pin placement for skeletal traction is generally an uncomplicated procedure. Duration of pin placement is significantly related to the likelihood of pin site infection.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed440    
    Printed32    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded70    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal